PhD position collaborators

Marta Martínez Avilés

Marta Martínez Avilés

Marta Martínez Avilés graduated as a veterinarian in the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where she also obtained in 2010 her PhD. She has joined our team as a post-doc to investigate better ways to integrate risk-based surveillance systems into current policy programs in animal health.

Her professional career took off in 2002 when she worked as an official veterinarian in the United Kingdom. Her training in veterinary epidemiology was enhanced with the fulfillment of the MSc in Veterinary Epidemiology (RVC & LHSTM, University of London, 2005), which included the involvement in a project on the development of a model to improve the control of peste des petits ruminants at CIRAD, a French research centre working with developing countries on agricultural and development issues. She then returned to Madrid to combine her work as a veterinary epidemiologist at the Animal Health Surveillance Centre (VISAVET) of the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and at the Animal Health Research Centre (CISA) of the National Institute for Agricultural and Food Research and Technology (INIA), with a PhD.

From 2006-2010 she explored tools to assess the risk of occurrence and spread of several OIE listed diseases, particularly viral infections including vector-borne diseases or those with wild animals’ implication, like avian influenza, African swine fever, bluetongue, African horse sickness, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Rift Valley fever or West Nile fever. Those risk assessments could then be applied in insurance systems as well as a planning and evaluation tool in surveillance and control plans at the local, national and regional level.

After she completed her PhD thesis “Assessment of the risk of introduction of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Spain through migratory wintering birds” with the maximum qualification and a European Mention, she moved to New Zealand for one year where she was involved in the development and teaching of a EU-World Bank-co-funded online MSc in Biosecurity and One Health for vets and medics from South Asia at Massey University.

Finally, she has spent the last two years (2011-2013) in Paris, France, at the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) where she coordinated the activities of the Scientific Commission for Animal Diseases which involved disease prevention and control strategies as well as science-informed policy decisions. She was also involved in activities related to the control of rabies and other zoonoses that involved collaboration with the public health sector.

Beatriz Martínez López

Beatriz Martínez López

DVM by the University Complutense of Madrid (UCM) (2004), Master in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (MPVM) by the University of California (2007), and PhD in Epidemiology and Preventive Veterinary Medicine in the UCM (2009). Currently, she is a researcher in the group leaded for Jose Manuel Sánchez-Vizcaíno, which belongs to the VISAVET group of the UCM and holds the OIE-reference labs for African Swine Fever and African Horse Sickness. Since 2009, she is also an Associate Profesor of Epidemiology in the University Cardenal Herrera-CEU of Valencia. She has been involved in more than 18 European and National projects and contracts, participated in more than 46 oral presentations and 10 posters in Congresses and conferences and, produced more than 36 publications (including papers, monographs, books and proceedings).

Her main research has been focus to applied quantitative risk analyses, Social Network Analysis and spread models for the evaluation of the potential entrance, spread and control of foot-and-mouth disease, classical swine fever, bluetongue, African Horse Sickness and African Swine Fever into Spain and the European countries.

 

Deborah Kukielka Zunzunegui

Deborah Kukielka Zunzunegui

Licenciada en Veterinaria por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, obtuvo su doctorado ‘Cum Laude’ y con mención europea en el año 2010. Su tesis se centró en el desarrollo de métodos de diagnóstico molecular para detectar virus ARN y en el estudio de su epidemiología molecular. Posteriormente, desarrolló una estancia postdoctoral en el hospital Monte Sinaí de Nueva York donde trabajó con el virus de la gripe. Ha desarrollado además estancias en centros de investigación de gran prestigio internacional como el Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Animales (NADC/USDA), perteneciente al Departamento de Agricultura de los EEUU, y en la unidad de virología de la Universidad de Ciencias Agrícolas (SLU,Uppsala, Suecia), centro de referencia de la OIE para el diagnóstico biotecnológico de enfermedades infecciosas veterinarias.

Actualmente también es profesora de Microbiología en la facultad de Farmacia de la Universidad CEU-San Pablo (Madrid).